Mitt Romney, American Parasite

At the time, Mitt Romney had been running Bain Capital since 1984, minting a reputation as a prince of private investment. A future prospectus by Deutsche Bank would reveal that by the time he left in 1999, Bain had averaged a shimmering 88 percent annual return on investment. Romney would use that success to launch his political career.

His specialty was flipping companies—or what he often calls “creative destruction.” It’s the age-old theory that the new must constantly attack the old to bring efficiency to the economy, even if some are destroyed along the way. In other words, people like Romney are wolves, culling the herd of the weak and infirm.

You might say that Mitt Romney got rich running corporate Death Panels.

(via the-feature)

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    Read this and ask yourself this question: “How would I feel if Mitt Romney bought the company I currently work for?”
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  10. doubleadoublek reblogged this from the-feature and added:
    You might say that Mitt Romney got rich running corporate Death Panels.
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